Reminder Montana Book Festival’s Emerging Writer’s Contest

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Missoula hosts the Montana Book Festival every autumn. It’s a great event chalked full of readings, panels, meetings with authors and publishers and presses. This year, the Festival is introducing a writing contest that’s open to regional new writers who live in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon and Washington.

Cash prizes and the chance to read your original work at the Festival in September. Cool. Deadline is May 15, 2016.

Check out contest details at www.montanabookfestival.org/contest.

 

MBF_CONTEST_FLYER_TABLOID (TURQ)

Episode 137 – Mark Gibbons / Galway Kinn

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Episode 137 – Mark Gibbons / Galway Kinnell – Poet Mark Gibbons ​reflects on the deep nostalgia of homecoming. He pairs his thoughts with a poem by Pulitzer prize-winning author, Galway Kinnell. http://ow.ly/8JU19X

“All for the Love of Rock and Roll” by Jason Bailey

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Jason is  a senior at the University of Montana, studying Creative Writing. His favorite band is KISS. His non-fiction piece, “All for the Love of Rock and Roll” begins with:

            I love the sound of a bass drum. A big boom, a thunderclap you can feel right in your gut. The squeak of the pedal as the mallet strikes the head. I’m partial to the shimmering sounds of cymbals (I used to call mine “sex” cymbals. Get it? Get It?!) I would work the pedal to the high-hat like a throttle, opening it ever so slightly to fit the groove, more gap for more funk. The ride cymbal was just what it sounded like; tap a beat like a locomotive running down the tracks. The crash cymbal did just that; the perfect exclamation point for a wicked fill, or to end a song on a bang. For those fills, the tom-toms brought rolling thunder to ooh and aah the crowd. Lastly, there was the snare drum. With coiled steel to shape the sound, the snare was the loyal soldier of this percussive battalion. Give me a pair of 2B drumsticks—maximum weight for maximum power—and it’s an amazing feeling, like driving a tank.

        What do you call a guy who hangs out with musicians? A drummer.

To read the rest of Jason’s story, please click this link “All_for_the_Love_of_Rock_and_Roll” by Jason Bailey 

“Lark” by Callie Ann Atkinson

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The Oval’s first honorable mention in poetry goes to Callie Ann Atkinson for “Lark.” She is a senior in the Creative-Writing program and is graduating this spring with her BA. She received her AA degree from Northwest College, before transferring to UM. Callie grew up on a small farm outside of Belfry, Montana, a place she continues to go back to every chance she gets. She consider the farm one of the strongest influences to her writing as well as writers such as Wendell Berry, Elizabeth Bishop, Richard Hugo, and Paulette Jiles. 

Lark

The sky is blue in Bierstadt light.

Many shades of sapphire and canary gold blush the ceiling of the world.

You brush leftover autumn leaves from porch steps.

A cardboard box has blown flattened against a fence.

There is the old man with his budgies—you look through each

glass pane—each frames a new

color–you like the brightest—it sings

the loudest.

Its so warm there must be swelling buds on branches.

Temperature drops then rises when the sun breaks the hill.

You wait for the rise to enter day.

Tea still steams in the kitchen beside oatmeal studded in raisins.

Gray winter light still held in apartment windows.

You know it could snow—tulips are resisting thought-ground

is thawing—frost replaced by rich

spring warmth.

Tomorrow it will rain—the faucet leaking in tempo.

Western meadowlark is back singing.

He will be wet—he will keep his song dripping from his beak.

Episode 136 – Toby Thompson / Ken McCull

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Episode 136 – Toby Thompson / Ken McCullough – Toby Thompson reflects on the conflicted feelings of those not chosen for service in times of war. He pairs his thoughts with a poem by Ken McCullough. http://ow.ly/8JpFni

“Autumn God” by Kaylene Big Knife

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Our first honorable mention for the Oval goes to Kaylene Big Knife for “Autumn God.”

Kaylene Jay Big Knife is an emerging illustrator and writer from the Chippewa Cree Tribe located on the Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation, Montana. Her major is Native American Studies with a minor in Studio Art. Big Knife’s creative interests include: humor, comics, fiction writing, watercolor, ink pens, collage, and cats, especially cats.

Watercolor painting of a women and a wold.
“Autumn God” by Kaylene Big Knife

Montana Book Festival’s Emerging Writer’s Contest

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MBF_POSTCARD_BLUEMissoula hosts the Montana Book Festival every autumn. It’s a great event chalked full of readings, panels, meetings with authors and publishers and presses. This year, the Festival is introducing a writing contest that’s open to regional new writers who live in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon and Washington.

Cash prizes and the chance to read your original work at the Festival in September. Cool. Deadline is May 15, 2016.

Check out contest details at www.montanabookfestival.org/contest.